The saying someone else's trash may be another's treasure held true for Kenneth Thornton of Hornbeck. On Tuesday he sold an antique piece of pottery he found in the trash to the Treasure Hunters Road Show for $1,100 dollars.


The saying someone else's trash may be another's treasure held true for Kenneth Thornton of Hornbeck. On Tuesday he sold an antique piece of pottery he found in the trash to the Treasure Hunters Road Show for $1,100 dollars.
The clay jar that Thornton held on to for nearly 10 years turned out to be a Newcomb Vase made in 1933 by the Newcomb College for Women, which is a division of Tulane University in New Orleans. The vase is made of  local and regional clay, which was a common practice of the Women's College. Men would craft the pottery while the women were the masterminds behind the design, all to help raise money for their college.
"When my children came home from college and told me what I had, I got some books from the state library and became very interested in the story behind the college," Thornton said.
Founded by a gift from Josphine Louise Newcomb in 1886, the college stressed an education both "practical and literary," according to Tulane's website (www.tulane.edu). The pottery created by the students is known all over the world. Newcomb Pottery, which operated for nearly 50 years, provided employment to roughly ninety Newcomb graduates and produced some 70,000 distinct pieces of work.
"He [Thornton] has an eye for pottery and loves vases," said Thornton's wife Elena. Kenneth saw something that stood out in a pile of trash while driving down Wolfhill Road in Hornbeck. He cleaned the dirt covered vase and thought it had a flaw.
"The flaw was actually [the image of] the moon shining through the cypress trees," said Thornton's wife. The mossy cypress trees and bayou setting depicting southern Louisiana was a popular design of many Newcomb pieces.
"This piece of pottery became very sentimental to me when I thought of all of the hard work these women put into these pieces, just to make a few dollars to support themselves and their college," Thornton said.