Mrs. Poteat’s sixth grade science class at Vernon Middle School had the privilege of launching two-liter soda bottle rockets on Wednesday, April 20. Before launching the rockets, however, they worked on building their rockets for two days.


Mrs. Poteat’s sixth grade science class at Vernon Middle School had the privilege of launching two-liter soda bottle rockets on Wednesday, April 20. Before launching the rockets, however, they worked on building their rockets for two days.
“The hardest part of making the rockets was getting the wings exactly right,” says one of Mrs. Poteat’s homeroom students, Dearias Yarborough.
While creating the rockets, the students experienced Newton’s second law of motion. This states that acceleration equals mass divided by force. However, while launching the rockets they saw Newton’s third law of motion-the action-reaction law. The contraption they used to launch their rockets consisted of a pump, a string and a tube. They screwed their two-liter bottle rockets (which were filled with 1000 mL of water) onto the tube. Next, they pumped the pump. Once it was pumped to 40 psi, they were ready to pull the string. They pulled the string and the rocket launched high (most of them went at least 500 feet) into the air. This exhibited the third law of motion.
“It was a fun way of experiencing Newton’s third and second laws of motion!” states Marissa Davis, one of Mrs. Poteat’s afternoon class students.
Everyone seemed to enjoy watching the rockets launched, and everyone had their own role in it.
“I was the one that got to pull the string!” Blake Martin tells us.
The classes were split into teams of three or four, and once they launched their teams’ rocket, they watched and braved the heat, as they waited for their other classmates to finish.  
“My favorite part was watching how high the rockets could go!” states Savanna Hunter, another one of Mrs. Poteat’s afternoon class students.
While they had fun messing with science, they also learned what caused their rocket to soar high, or take a leap and then come right back down to meet back up with the ground.
We learned that the longer the nose of our rocket was, explains Morgan Dowden, the more it cut through the air, causing it to go higher.
So, as you can see, Mrs. Poteat’s science students enjoyed their science class that afternoon. Many of the students felt the same way as Madison Mount, who said, "I think it was a great hands-on learning experience for everyone! I would love to do it again!"