Training is an important, ongoing part of Army life, as the recently redeployed soldiers of Company B, 88th Brigade Support Battalion, 1st Maneuver Enhancement Brigade well know.

Training is an important, ongoing part of Army life, as the recently redeployed soldiers of Company B, 88th Brigade Support Battalion, 1st Maneuver Enhancement Brigade well know.
They began training on nine-line medical evacuation Sept. 5 at the 5th Aviation Battalion hangar on Fort Polk Army Airfield.
Soldiers learned methods of securing causalities and loading them onto helicopters.
They also began training for their maintenance mission for 88th BSB, said 1st Lt. Zachary Horne, platoon leader for Company B, 88th BSB.
“We wanted to get out here and do some realistic training,” he said. “Some stuff that the soldiers wouldn’t just be bored with. I’m sure everybody learned a lot.”
The instructor, Ariel Rodriguez, a flight medic in 5th Avn. Bn., demonstrated the UH 72 Lakota, a multi-role light utility helicopter. He talked about the safety and capability of the aircraft and many others.
The soldiers received hands-on training on nine-line MEDEVAC, hot static load and cold static load, and different tie down techniques.
“Today we conducted training on how to properly conduct nine-line MEDEVAC,” said Pfc. Eric Lowley, a mechanic in Company B. “We went over the revised addition which showed us how to ask for specialized equipment and properly load medical evacuations."
Nine-line helps improve clarity during the critical and urgent time during a medical evacuation.
“You can always read the nine-line cards but you never get the practical experience," Lowley said. "You think you’ll know how to do it when a helicopter comes but now I know that I probably wouldn’t have known how to do it.
“If we didn’t have this training and ran into problems (while on missions), we would not have known the proper procedures and would have burned useful time,” he said.
The ability to send the correct nine-line medical evacuation message can save the lives of injured personnel.
“This training was pretty much as perfect as it could get,” Lowley said.
“The medics here were outstanding,” Horne said, “and this was the first step to more live training.”