The Police Jury labored, at Monday's meeting, over whether the Judicial Building cooling system system should be replaced or repaired. Jim Tuck, Police Jury President, said whether we replace it or get it fixed, it is still a month of waiting.

The Police Jury labored, at Monday's meeting, over whether the Judicial Building's cooling system should be replaced or repaired. Jim Tuck, Police Jury President, said, whether we replace it or get it fixed, it is still a month of waiting.

The building is currently being cooled by half of the failing equipment's capacity, and is running on one circuit. "When temperatures get into mid-80s, it won't work," said Thomas Adams, General Manager from Star Service, Inc.

Curtis Clay, Police Jury Vice President, read from the finance committee report-- "The compressor on circuit one, at the Judicial Building, needs to be replaced. The current compressor is under a five year warranty. It will cost approximately $15,024 to put in a new one. However, the warranty compressor will be analyzed after it is removed. If it is found that the failure was caused by an issue outside the scope of the warranty, the total cost of $39,561 will be billed to the jury."

An analysis of why it broke, and whether it is covered by the warranty or not, will take a three to four weeks. "An 'autopsy' of the compressor needs to take place in order to diagnose the problem," said Adams. The current chiller is 17-years-old. They generally last for about 20, he said.

Tuck requested that Adams, provide detailed and current costs for a new compressor, including installation fees and any other costs associated with acquiring a new system.

"I don't want all the judges and everybody sitting over there in 80-90 degree heat," said Tuck.