Residents of the New Llano packed the New Llano town hall Tuesday night at the town council meeting to voice their displeasure over the town's ban against pit bulls earlier this year.

Residents of the New Llano packed the New Llano town hall Tuesday night at the town council meeting to voice their displeasure over the town's ban against pit bulls earlier this year.
"We shouldn't punish good owners for bad owners," Aaron Dickerson said. "Dogs don't hurt people. Bad owners who raise their dogs incorrectly hurt people."
Five different residents spoke Tuesday night, with many more wanting to speak before Mayor Freddie Boswell closed the pre-council meeting and opened the regular meeting. Boswell limited only New Llano residents to speak at the meeting, and town attorney Jack Simms concurred, saying that if they didn't live in New Llano, "the law won't affect them."
Several residents believed that the pit bull ban would hurt the town.
"Families are going to choose to live elsewhere," Kelly Moore said. "I think this (law) js deplorable, and it's a direct reflection on council."
Councilmembers maintained that they're appointed to represent all citizens of the town.
"We've been put here as a governing board to make the best choices for the safety and well being of all citizens," councilwoman Charlotte Cooper said.
Boswell also said that in the two months prior to the ordinance being introduced, there were eight incidents with dogs, all of which involved pit bulls, he said.
"The last issue was with a 2 year old baby sitting across the street in the yard," Boswell said. He also said that the child nearly had his arm and eye tore out.
"That's why the issue came up, and that's why the law was passed."
Boswell and other council members, including Carolyn Todd, said that when the ordinance was introduced, only a handful of people showed up to the meetings.
"We don't have any choice to make the decision that's at hand, because it's usually just us and a few other people," Todd said. "We are here as a board to make a decision that best interests our town. If you're not here on those days to help us make those choices, then it ends up like this."
Todd also said that Angel Negron, "with a couple of other people," were the only ones who came to those meetings. Negron was another individual who spoke Tuesday, and asked why officials recently entered his yard to remove his dog. Boswell replied that when Negron was approached the first time, he was told he had until Aug. 7 to comply. Later, the dog was picked up by city officials, Boswell said, and Negron was informed the dog could not come back into the town limits.
Still, you brought it back," Boswell said. "And still, people complained…so that's why we came and got the dog."
Others, including Christina Nelson, said they were not made aware that pit bulls were not allowed in town limits before they moved into New Llano. Boswell, however, maintained the opposite.
"When you come here to turn your water on, you were told no pit bulls," he said. Boswell also said that the owners of the properties should have made prospective residents aware of the ordinance, to which Nelson and others denied.
Nelson also claimed that the town's DNA testing system was flawed.
"My independent test came back, and it's the same testing kit you all use, with a 25 percent difference in the breed," she said.
Todd maintained that nobody showed up to the meetings to express the views they expressed Tuesday night.
"Rules were made to be followed," she said. "We made them because you weren't here. We put them in place, and I don't like a whole lot of rules, but I follow them. If the rules were made, all you had to do was do it in a timely manner. We gave people time to do it."